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Other 8-point Stars ***


These stars stand outside all other categories. That includes one star that has 12 points, not eight: For now, the unusual, asymmetrical North Star is on this page with other split-point stars. Click on a small graphic below for a short-cut to the block description.

 

Winged 9 Patch
The North Star
North Star

Star of the East
Silver & Gold

Long-pointed Star
Star of Empire
Hatties Choice

Star of North Carolina
Jupiter Star
Feathered Star
Star of Chamblie
Western Spy
George-
town Circle

Rising Sun
King David's Crown

Stars & Cubes


Winged 9 Patch

Winged 9 Patch
Kansas City Star
1940
This odd little block breaks down into four nine-patch checkerboards (one in each corner), four bowtie blocks (one on each side) and a Sawtooth (in the middle). We've chosen the colors of our graphic to emphasize those sections.

In publishing Winged 9 Patch in 1940, the Kansas City Star noted that the quilter might prefer a "medley of sharply contrasting colors" over its two-color illustration.

We actually prefer that two-color version, which brings out the Sawtooth in the center.
Winged 9 Patch
Winged 9 Patch

The North Star

The North Star
Cincinnati Enquirer
1943
The Divided Star/LeMoyne Star

The North Star was published in the Cincinnati Enquirer in 1943, according to Jinny Beyer. Mrs. Danner's Fourth Quilt Book called it The Divided Star. It's also a variation of the LeMoyne Star. Click here for more LeMoyne variations: 

The North Star

North Star


North Star
Laura Wheeler
1940
North Star was designed by the person whose pseudonym was Laura Wheeler. The patterns were sold by mail order by the Old Chelsea Station Needlecraft Company in New York and advertised in newspapers. (Old Chelsea was the name of the post office closest to the company's offices.) This one appeared in the Sioux City Journal in 1940, according to Jinny Beyer's Quilter's Album of Patchwork Patterns.




Sun Rays Quilt showing diamond shape

Star of the East

Star of the East
Grandma Clark
1931


This compass star, published in 1931 in a Grandmother Clark booklet, has just one name, but it shares that name with almost a dozen other blocks. The booklet showed it in solid colors on a print background.

A compass star, or compass rose, is an eight-point star oriented so that each point corresponds with a compass point: North, Northeast, East, Southeast, South, Southwest, West, and Northwest.

In our century, whole-quilt Mariner's Compass designs have become so elaborate that they include more compass points than any navigator really wants to count. They're gorgeous, though. Just take a look by clicking here:

Star of the East




Silver & Gold

Silver and Gold
Gold & Silver/Star of the East/Winter Star

Silver & Gold was published in the Kansas City Star in 1931 with the colors arranged as they are at left. The Star also suggested using a 3rd color for the small triangles. Nancy Cabot called it Gold & Silver in 1935and then Winter Stars in 1938. The name Star of the East is from Carrie Hall.
Silver & Gold

Long-pointed Star

Long-pointed Star
Kansas City Star
1942
This beautiful star, with its two lengths of star points, is drawn up on a circular star grid. It was published in the Kansas City Star in April 1942. It's drawn up on a star grid.

The block shines with high-contrast colors. That's why, we've also shown it here in red, white, and blue.

 

Long-pointed Star
Long-pointed Star

Star of Empire

Star of Empire
Stone
1906
Clara Stone's Star of Empire is a cousin of the Long-pointed Star, and it's a forerunner of the Cathedral Window quilting that became a trend some 80 years later. Cathedral Window puts a black border around each part of a block, giving it the look of leaded glass. 

And what of the bizarre name? We'd guess that it was a reference to the British Empire, which was still strong, and also to a sentiment that because America had British roots, it was still British at heart.
Star of Empire

Hattie's Choice


Hattie's Choice
Stone
1906
Stone's Hattie's Choice, #70 in her Practical Needlework of 1906, is obviously kin to the Star of Empire, except that it's dressed up and ready for town, with one more layer of concentric shapes. Hattie is short for Harriet, btw.

We've posted both blocks in lavender here because — well, Star of Empire just begs for a royal color, and also, we just felt like it.
Hattie's Choice

Star of North Carolina

Star of North Carolina
LAC, 1922
The first Ladies Art Company catalog with pictures, published in 1896, includes the first 400 blocks of the LAC's collection. This block, the LAC's #474, was published in 1922.

Like Jupiter Star below, this star is drawn on a star (polar) grid, so that the points all end on a circle. Like Jupiter Star, the block's corners are triangles.

The two blocks make for very different-looking quilts. Which do you like best?

Star of North Carolina

Star of North Carolina

Jupiter Star

Jupiter Star
Kansas City Star
1934
Star of Jupiter/A Jupiter of Many Points

This block was first published in the Kansas City Star in June 1934 and republished, as the KCS tended to do, in May 1956. This time, however, it was an accidental repeat: The two blocks had two different illustrations and were sent in by two different readers, one from Kansas and one from Oklahoma.

When we drew up the block on the computer, we found that our octagonal center patch was a tad smaller than the one in the KCS illustrations. Apparently you can't emulate the block without either using the KCS pattern or tracing it. 

We've since noticed that Jinny Beyer's Quilter's Album of Patchwork Patterns also regularizes the block. We didn't cut apart the pattern pieces and extrapolate the proportions of the pieces from the measurements. We were gardening today and we're just too tired. So let's just say: If Jinny Beyer did it that way, it's okay by us. 

If you would like to make your block exactly like the KCS version, click on the "Make It!" icon above.
Jupiter Star
Jupiter Star

Feathered Star

Feathered Star
Prize Winning Designs
1931

Chestnut Burr/Radiant Star/Aunt Betty's Star/Snowflake

This beautiful star was being made long before 1931, when it was first published as Chestnut Burr and Radiant Star in a quilting booklet called Prize Winning Designs. The name Feathered Star is from Quilts of Virginia.
Feathered Star

Star of Chamblie

Star of Chamblie
Hall
1935
"An antique design brought to Canada from France in the early part of the 19th century," is all that Hall and Kretsinger have to say about the Star of Chamblie in their 1935 book The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt in America. 

In fact, Fort Chambly was built just east of Montreal in 1711, one of five built to protect French immigrants from the Iroquois Indians. It's on the Richelieu River and named for the nearby Chambly Rapids. The Brits spelled it Chamblee. Part of Atlanta has that name. We'd love to know why.

We've seen several color variations of Star of Chamblie blocks, but none quite so beautiful as the example that Hall stitched up in the 1930s. We've emulated her colors at left.
Star of Chamblie

Western Spy



Western Spy
Stone
1906
Clara Stone's curious block works almost as if it is intended to be an octagonal block — quite plausibly, since most octagonal blocks are connected with an on-point square. Some of those squares are four-patches, with four block corners sewn together.

Western Spy was published in Stone's 1906 booklet Practical Needlework, which says nothing about the origin of the name.

Western Spy looks lovely as a full quilt. It has the look of of a round design, but there is not a single curved seam.




Western Spy
 

Georgetown Circle



Georgetown Circle
Finley
1929
Crown of Thorns/Memory Wreath 

This three-color, 12-pointed block is from Finley's 1929 Old Patchwork Quilts. Georgetown is, of course, a neighborhood within Washington, DC, but that's not necessarily the "Georgetown Circle" that inspired the block.

The block combines both wreath and star patterns, Finley notes, and has also been called "The Crown of Thorns" and "Memory Wreath." Because Georgetown Circle is the most distinctive of the names, that's what we've called it here.

Besides, memory wreathes transcend a single block. Finley wrote, "The blocks of the Memory Wreath were pieced from the dresses of one's dear departed, the white center of the block in the exact middle of the quilt usually bearing a fitting inscription in cross-stitch."




Georgetown Circle
 

Stars & Cubes

Stars & Cubes
LAC #15
1897

Star/Yankee Pride/Heavenly Stars/Captive Beauty/Double Star/Cubes & Tiles/Maple Leaf

The star-in-star block was first published under the lackluster name Star in Ohio Farmer (1896), according to Barbara Brackman's Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt Patterns, and in the following year as Stars & Cubes in the Ladies Art Company catalog (#15). The other names came from several writers and publishers. 

The block is sometimes mistaken for a Carpenter's Star, but it's not quite the same — besides being on an 8x8 grid, it looks as if it's on point.

Arguably, the design is even lovelier when the blocks are in a group. Click on the graphic for a whole-quilt mockup, and you'll see what we mean. 

 





Stars & Cubes

King David's Crown

King David's Crown
Finley
1929
Finley cited this block as one of the most often used for "every-day" quilts 'way back when, meaning the block was probably made from scraps. It's laid out on a 10x10 grid.

 


King David's Crown

Rising Sun

Western Spy
Page
1941
The designer Nancy Page presented this multi-pointed star block in May 1941 in the Birmingham News.

It would be a good while before another Rising Sun block was published in an American newspaper. Pearl Harbor was bombed by the Japanese that December.