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Chevron-star Cousins


These blocks may stretch the definition of "star," but they do feature chevrons.

 

Doe & Darts
Doe & Darts
Sandhills Star
Modern Star
Star of Many Points
Merry Kite
Wedding Bouquet
Swing in the Center LAC
Swing in the Center Finley
Fannie's Fan

Doe & Darts

Doe & Darts
Finley
1929
David & Goliath/The Four Darts/The Bull's Eye/Flying Darts/Bull's Eye

While Doe & Darts is the name most familiar to quilters nowadays, it was the last on Ruth Finley's list for this block in her 1929 book Old Patchwork Quilts. Her preferred name was David & Goliath. We understand that Nancy Cabot also called it Bull's Eye in the Chicago Tribune in 1933.

The proportions of Doe & Darts vary depending on who drafts it. Doe & Dart patterns on the Web are drawn on a 10x10 grid. Most are inaccurately credited to Finley. Our "Make It!" icon above links to our diagram of Finley's block; the Make It! icon below links to instructions for the Web variation.
Doe & Darts (Finley)

Doe & Darts

Doe & Darts

Web, unattributed
David & Goliath/Katie's Favorite

Although it has been attributed to Finley, this version of Doe & Darts got its name elsewhere. It seems to be the only version of Doe & Darts on the Web.

Often, Doe & Darts is said to date back to 1782. That information came from Nancy Cabot's description of Star of Many Points, below. Since Cabot offered no sources, we don't know what to say about that.

Nancy Page called it David & Goliath in 1935 and Katie's Favorite in 1943, according to Beyer's Quilter's Album. This version is on a 10x10 grid.
Doe & Darts (Popular)

Sandhills Star

Sand Hills Star
Kansas City Star
1939
The Kansas City Star published this block in 1939. The block within the star is a four-square checkerboard (in quiltspeak, a four-patch).

The Sandhills (or Sand Hills) is a giant patch of land that early 20th-century homesteaders found too sandy to farm but not too sandy for grazing cattle. The region makes up a quarter of Nebraska, which was home to the KCS reader who sent this block to the newspaper.
Sandhills Star

Modern Star

Modern Star
Grandma Dexter
ca. 1931
Star of Many Points/David & Goliath/Doe & Darts/Four Darts

First published in a Grandma Dexter booklet (#36A) around 1931, Modern Star had a large offset square in the center and four chevron darts made from scrap prints.

We haven't seen instructions for this block on the Web. Our "Make It!" icon links to a page with our diagrams for both Modern Star and Star of Many Points, below. Lest you wonder, they're based on a 5x5 grid.


Modern Star

Star of Many Points

Star of Many Points
Cabot
1936
David & Goliath/Doe & Darts/Four Darts

Nancy Cabot published a variation of Modern Star in 1936 with a different color scheme and gave it many of the same names as Finley's Doe & Darts (above).

What's different? Cabot's Star of Many Points alternates two colors for every piece not in the background color. Cabot dated Star of Many Points to 1782. She didn't give any sources, but the year 1782 is nevertheless given for every Doe & Darts variation in sight.

Note: Cabot presented two blocks called Star of Many Points. We have yet to post the other.
Star of Many Points

Merry Kite

Merry Kite
LAC #515
1928

Merry Kite
Nancy Cabot
1932
Ladies Art Company block #515 was published in 1928, and our graphic shows it as it appeared in the catalog.

The block was republished four years later in Nancy Cabot's Chicago Tribune column. Cabot's version is much, much easier to make because she split half the diamonds along the seamline. We've reproduced the diagram here. See the dotted lines? They're Cabot's gift to the sanity of quilters everywhere.

Our diagram includes Cabot's variation too. To use the diagram, click the lavender "Make It!" icon and scroll down. For instructions on how to make Cabot's block, click on the blue "Make It!" icon.


Star of Many Points

Wedding Bouquet

Wedding Bouquet
Nancy Page
1943

First published in 1943, Wedding Bouquet is credited to Nancy Page. Her syndicated quilting column was the source of some 600 blocks, although not all of them were original.

Still, Page was good at what she did, and she inspired quilters to start a Nancy Page Quilt Club. The club's not around any more, but then, neither are its members. We look forward to meeting them, but not just yet.
Wedding Bouquet